Milton was reported to be the fastest growing city in the Golden Horseshoe, with a 71.4% increase in population between 2001 and 2006.  It’s distance from Downtown Toronto (40km) and Go Transit service, makes Milton perfect for commuters.  Milton, however, started off as a cozy town in 1857 that was generally an agricultural city full of farmers.  Thus, unlike Hamilton and Burlington, there are very few photographs of Milton the city, as it tended to be farming lands.  Here are a few of our favourite Milton signs from what we could dig up.

Milton Building Supplies

Milton Building Supplies
The building was originally built for Winn’s Shoe Factory in 1892. This photo was taken in the 1960s and it has all sorts of historical relevance when it comes to signs. It has vehicle lettering, vehicle graphics, hanging signs, and storefront signs.

Crawford Lake

Crawford Lake Milton

Crawford Lake is a meromictic lake, meaning it is deeper than than the surface area above it. This limits circulation, which prevents oxygen from penetrating the lake, making any organic material that falls to the bottom resistant to rotting. As the sign states, Indians lived here in about 1434, where we could tell what the Indians lived off of from preserved pollen in the lake.

The Metropolitan Bank

Metropolitan Bank Milton

This photo was taken in 1910 and was located at 244 Main Street East. The Metropolitan Bank was taken over by the Bank of Nova Scotia, it was eventually demolished and replaced with the new Bank of Nova Scotia Building.  We really like the window lettering on this 1910 building, which would have been carefully hand painted.

Rattlesnake Point

Rattlesnake Point Sign

This outdoor sign was put up in 1977 and holds up pretty well for being over 35 years old.  Rattlesnake point is one of our favourite conservation areas to visit in Milton, and we appreciate learning about its fascinating history.

Robertson Screw Factory

Robertson Factory Milton

Milton is home to the Robertson factory, which invented and produces the Robertson screw head. P. L. Robertson was an inventor who was demonstrating the flat head screwdriver one day, when it slipped and cut his hand.  Thus, the much safer square head screwdriver was invented.  This building main office on 97 Bronte Street has been there since 1908, where it remains today.  By 1950, Robertson Screw Fasteners in Milton employed 600 people.